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Spring 2013

Editor-In-Chief

Michelle Corbet(editor@dailyhelmsman.com)

Managing Editor
Evan Lewis (managing@dailyhelmsman.com)

Design Editor
Amanda Mitchell

Copy Editors
Leah Bolton
Evan Lewis
Jenny Parker

Sports Editor

Bryan Heater (bheater@dailyhelmsman.com)

Sports Reporters (sports@dailyhelmsman.com)
Meagan Nichols

Greg Williams

News Reporters (news@dailyhelmsman.com)

Lisa Babb
Alise Carter
Elizabeth Cooper
Samantha Esgro
Erica Hartsfield
Erica Horton
Margot Pera
Paula K. Peyton
Samuel Prager
Jaci Redmon

Arielle Robinson
Shelby Smith
Melissa Wray

Photographers
Natalie Cole

Nathanael Packard

General Manager

Candy Justice

Advertising Manager (ads@dailyhelmsman.com)
Bob Willis

Administrative Sales

Sharon Whitaker

Advertising Production
Hailey Uhler

Advertising Sales
Robyn Nickell
Michael Parker

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” A LITTLE MORE CONVERSATION” DISCUSSES THE OPPORTUNITY FOR

ANY U OF M STUDENT TO TEACH IN JAPAN. THIS IS AN ALL  EXPENSE PAID TRIP FOR EDUCATION MAJORS. THIS IS A WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITY FOR KIDS IN AMERICA AS WELL AS JAPAN TO ENDURE DIFFERENT CULTURES AND LEARN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE.

253005_10151239292146995_1081642600_n “9/11 REMEMBERS”…I WAS HONORED TO DO A SPECIAL ISSUE FOR THE PAPER ON SEPTEMBER 11TH. I INTERVIEWED SEVERAL OFFICERS WHO VISITED THE PENTAGON WHEN THE PLANE CRASHED INTO THE BUILDING…VISIT WWW.DAILYHELMSMAN.COM FOR MORE DETAILS.

431422_10100101187307188_934647602_n3EVERY YEAR THE UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS HOSTS AN RSO FAIR (REGISTERED STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS) IN ORDER TO AID INCOMING FRESHMEN AS WELL AS CURRENT STUDENTS ON HOUSING AND ON-CAMPUS RESOURCES. THERE IS ALWAYS MANY ACTIVITIES TO BE A PRT OF AND TO GT INVOLVED IN.

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THE DAILY HELMSMAN IS AN INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS.THERE I WORKED ALL OVER CAMPUS MEETING NEW PEOPLE AND WAS ABLE TO BOND WITH THEM THROUGH INTERVIEWS AND PERSONAL STATEMENTS. THUS GAINING VALUABLE EXPERIENCE AS A WRITER, EDITOR AND INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER.

WUMR: MEMPHIS’ONLY JAZZ RADIO

Arielle Robinson

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With 150 watts of power, WUMR is Memphis’s only jazz station that plays a variety of jazz selections. There are about 40,000 listeners during the station’s most popular fundraiser, the Radio Thon. The station’s satellite reaches from the Memphis area to Hernando County.  However, from the U.K. to Europe about 25 countries tune in everyday. WUMR relies on volunteers and students for on-air shifts, and to manage some of the daily tasks.

Melvin Massey, Jr. is the station’s general manager. He coordinates with the staff members on the new software for disc playing and equipment maintenance. “The new programs that we have are “cool”, said Massey. There are internships and volunteer opportunities available. There are forty Disk Jockeys, five sport commentators, and six paid students. The DJ’s are trained and meet twice a month to practice real world scenarios and feel the “flow of the radio.”

There are different segments that make up the show: Beale Street Caravan that airs from 6-7p.m., Drive Time from 4-6p.m., sports segments, Memphis local bands, and the hot topic or service announcements.  Chris Davis, the station’s Program Director hosts the morning show every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 6:30 in the morning. The service messages are called underwriting because they are not advertisements or commercials. This is how the station receives revenues. Beale Street Caravan is the show’s most popular segment.

The Station uses a rotation clock that directs the flow of the show. For example, the red spaces represent Latin Jazz, yellow represents the DJ’s choice, blue represents Memphis Jazz, and the white spaces represent the Top 20. The Radio thon is the station’s biggest fundraiser. Furthermore, there are 130 universities participating with the University of Memphis in the Radio Thon. Approximately 40,000 people tune in to WUMR.

WUMR has been the University Of Memphis broadcasting outlet since 1979. “When I founded the station, we chose the all-jazz format for three reasons, we didn’t want to compete with the programming of commercial radio in Memphis, and none of the stations were playing jazz regularly. We wanted a musical style that appealed to a multiracial audience and finally jazz was a format that fit in nicely with the jazz curriculum in our music department,” said Richard Ranta, founding Dean of the College of Communication and Fine Arts (CCFA).

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Third Annual Riv er City Brewer’s Festival will be located on Beale Street in Handy Park and will include more than 100 different beers from around the world March 31, 2012 from 12-4p.m. and from 6-10p.m.

Each ticket holder will sample fantastic domestic and imported beer. Some of the signature local breweries will include Yazoo, Ghost River, Blue Ribbon, Boscos, etc. Ghost River Brewing currently offers the following handcrafted beers: Golden Ale, its ingredients include malted barley and German variety hops, it’s mellow and is refreshing with Munich and caramel malts. Copperhead Red, GABF® 2011, Silver Medal in Irish-Style Red Ale and bold flavors of American varietal hops.  Boscos has been brewing award-winning handcrafted beers for over sixteen years.   In accordance with the premier beers, some of the area’s finest restaurants will be on hand providing free samples of their signature dishes.

“The festival will provide nationally and domestically acclaimed micro-brewed ales, pilsners, stouts and everything in-between,” according to Christina White, Director of the River City Management Group. “There will be experts to help you distinguish the different appearances, smells, beer styles, and taste; malts are sweet, roasty and smoky and hops are resiny, herbal and spicy,” stated White.

At last year’s event the festival supported a charity for autism. “Charities are really our main focus, our proceeds goes to the charities,” said White. This year the River City Management Group has selected The Ronald McDonald House of Memphis as the 2012 Benefactor for the festival. The Ronald McDonald House of Memphis is a “home-away-from-home” for families who are in Memphis while their child is receiving treatment for cancer or another catastrophic illness at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The official after party for the festival will be at Rum Boogie on Beale Street. Tickets for the Brewers’ Festival are $30 for each session and $55 for both sessions.

Memphis Fashion Week

ariellerenee

The inaugural Memphis Fashion Weekend started with a bang this past Saturday as Memphis own stylettes woed the crowd with their runway fashion at the Jack Robinson Gallery located in Downtown Memphis.

“The Jack Robinson Gallery was packed with young women wanting to become models. This venue secures a strong place for fashion in Memphis future,” wrote Hannah Sayle, Memphis Flyer.

The night began with the spring line from Ellis Dixon. Her line was dominated by crop tops, pretty neutrals, and feminine silks and shapes. Carol Peretz introduced a spring line of cocktail and occasion dresses with sumptuous textures, feminine patterns, and bold colors. And finally, Philosophy’s spring collection wowed attendees with exquisite lace details, elegant draping, and an overall genuine quality. The joint endeavor of native Memphians and sisters, Annie Griffin and Robin Gerber now work out of Atlanta, but their line of lively, feminine casual wear, with bold colors and accessible style can be found at Oak Hall in Oxford, Ms.

Memphis Fashion Weekend presented a mix of Memphis designers along with National brands.  Seven designers showcased their Spring 2012 collections. The designers include Ellis Dixon (Memphis), Philosophy, Carol Peretz, Annie Griffin (Memphis), Billy Reid, and Neil Bieff.  These stores can be found with these designers: James Davis, Joseph. Kittie Kyle, Oak Hall, The Mednikow Boutique, Lavish, Southern Couture, Peria, Shop Girl and Turkoyz.

“Ellis Dixon, who now works out of New York City designed the clothes that the stylettes modeled,” stated Channing Shaw, aspiring model.

This event supports ArtsMemphis and up-and-coming models and fashion designers. ArtsMemphis is a fundraising and grant making organization that supports arts organizations, arts education and outreach efforts and leads a community-wide Audience Development Initiative to promote engagement in the arts.

“We love to promote advancement in the arts,” stated Bob Craddock, Board Chair, Executive Committee Co-Chair.

Full Professorship @ the University of Memphis

By Arielle Robinson

Being an African-American Woman here at the University of Memphis, I feel it is an outstanding achievement for Katherine Grace Hendrix to receive full professorship.

She has surpassed her goals by teaching, research, and mentoring others. I sat down with Dr. Hendrix and the experience was emotional. I could feel her confidence in a way that was inspiring.

She spoke with such wisdom and clarity which made me listen more intently than before. I felt a “grandmother presence” not because of her age but because of her atonement—her sincere and humble demeanor. 

As I wrote in my reporter’s notebook, I also intently learned a few things along the way…

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Dr. Katherine Grace Hendrix – Department of Communication

Promotion to Full Professor

–2011-2012 recipient of the College of Communication and Fine Arts (CCFA) Dean’s Research Award

–2012 Southern States Communication Association (SSCA) Michael Osborn Teacher-Scholar Award

 

1. What year did you begin working at the university?

My first year at the University of Memphis began in August 1994.  After earning my doctorate, I made the transition from community college administration and teaching to university teaching and research.

2.  Has it been your goal to attain so much success for yourself?

Yes. I believe in performing to best of one’s ability but not at the expense of hurting others.

3.  What was your purpose before becoming a full professor?

My purpose has been the same before earning this promotion and now – be the best teacher that I can, conduct meaningful research, and treat others as I desire to be treated.

4.  What steps or advice can you give to a freshman student for the 2012-13 year?

Be organized, persistent even when the classes are difficult, and a pleasant person to be around.

5.    Explain your feelings on your promotion to full professor despite your obstacles of being         

an African-American woman.

I am proud of my accomplishment and that I represent not only the Communication Department and University of Memphis but also my family.

6.    Does your minority status make your job more fulfilling? Explain.

The road to full professor is a difficulty one and, as a result, many do not even try.  As a woman of color, the road has unforeseen twists and turns that make the journey even more challenging.  Yes, I’m proud to be among that very tiny percentage of Black females who have achieved this honor.  I must say that I had did the work but I didn’t achieve this honor without the help of others.

7.    Do you feel a difference in your job/workload now that you’re a full professor?

One of the benefits of achieving this level within academia is I now have time to pursue projects that might be a bit more time-consuming such as writing several textbooks.

8.         How has your level of success helped the alumni and current students here at the

            University of Memphis?

I mentor former students and have helped several earn their first publication. I do the same for our current students, of all races and nationalities, who seek my advice regarding successfully completing their graduate studies and entering the job market.  In addition, I try to encourage and assist our undergraduates especially those who come from challenging family situations or are returning to school later in life.  I’ve always been a smart, disciplined person but I’m the first Ph.D. in my family and had to learn through the school of hard knocks with lots of prayer and support from my husband.  As a result, I try to make the path easier for others.

9.         Now that you have attained full professorship, do you feel that your time here has come

            to an end, or do you feel that there is more work to be done?

I’m not one to say, “I’ve arrived” so there’s much left to do.  For example, the Communication Department is currently re-conceptualizing our major and course offerings at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

10.      What are your methods for establishing your GTA’s desired field of education?

Not sure about this question.

11.       Do you feel that communication is a major factor in a student’s college education? If so,

            how?

Definitely.  In our discipline, we say that communication is at the core of our existence and when people overlook the importance of effective communication they are on the path to misunderstanding and possibly major conflict.  Effective communication is essential to understanding the perspectives of others and constructive interaction.

I encourage our UofM undergraduates to investigate Communication as a major and to, at least, enroll in a few Communication courses beyond the Communication 2381 (Oral Communication) class required for general education.

12.      What do you feel are your best qualities that allowed your success to become noticed by

           the university.

I always give 110% to my teaching, research, and service.  I learned the expectations for promotion and methodically met those requirements while never trying to take advantage of others or being unethical.  I’m not a conniving opportunist.  I do the work, pray, and try to live a life of integrity; just like my advice for the incoming freshmen.

Student Organizations Run the Show…

With the University being one of the top schools, organizations around campus are providing its credibility with leadership and service to students as well as the community.

Upcoming freshman for the 2012-13 school year will have a field day when choosing what clubs or organizations to be a part.

“We want our students to get plugged in different organizations,” said Laura Hoffman, Coordinator of the Student Involvement and Leadership Council.

There are over 200 organizations the University provides. Incoming freshman may choose from Student Government Association, Up ‘till Dawn, Black Student Association, Student Activity Council, and also become a part of the Student Involvement and Leadership Committee. These organizations are screaming for students to get involved. Not only are these organizations an outlet for students but beneficial to the community.

“Students run the show,” said Laura Hoffman, Coordinator of the Student Involvement and Leadership Council.

The Office of Student Leadership and Involvement offers a variety of leadership programs designed to enhance leadership skills. Student Leadership and Involvement provides programs and opportunities through which students may become meaningfully involved in campus life. Programs and activities support the Student Life mission of enhancing overall personal development.

Furthermore, the Student Activities Council  (SAC) also create events and programs to help future and current student learn more about campus and post college decisions. SAC is composed of five committees: Entertainment, Cultural Arts, Ideas & Issues, Films Committee, and University Traditions.  Members come together once a week to create events and work on projects and posters to post around campus. Members also conduct surveys and questionnaires to obtain feedback for future advancement.

“SAC provides a wonderful learning experience so that the University will not be boring,” said Heather Maclin, President of SAC.

Interested in politics? Well SGA would be perfect for upcoming law or criminal justice majors. Members work on the many issues that come about on campus.  Tuition and parking are the biggest concerns among students. Russell Borne, SGA president, hopes to work with the Tennessee Board of Regents and Governor Bill Haslam on the rising cost of tuition. Borne also wants to make a direct impact by promoting a Drug Free Campus and he want more student involvement for the athletic program.

“Student Government Association meets the needs of the campus. We are the voice and leaders of the students,” said Russell Borne, SGA President.

An organization around campus focuses on the community as well. Black Student Association focuses on the principles of encouraging academic excellence, social, and political awareness. Throughout the years the Black Student Association has grown and flourished into an organization that not only represents African American students but also strives for the excellence of all students at The University of Memphis.

Up ’til Dawn, an organization on campus, unites students, staff and their local communities with a goal to help the children of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Students who lead Up ’til Dawn on their campuses educate the community about St. Jude while raising money through a variety of activities.

“The University of Memphis Up ’til Dawn program is selling t-shirts that have “Unite To Fight Childhood Cancer” printed on them,” said Kimmy Do, Executive Director.

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